Traditional japanese house

Picture of the day

May 05th 2010

 

These are picture taken not far from my house in kobe, I do pass in front of this house a lot and always loved the wall so I had to make it the pic of the day!

The best Japanese dictionary App

The best Japanese dictionary App
I did a post about must have applications for iPhone and iTouch back a month ago and a recent version on GaijinPot, but someone pointed out to me that there was a dictionary App out there that was killing all Japanese dictionary out there! And he was right!!!


The App is called Kotoba and the best thing about it is that it is free!! Yes you don’t get that a lot especially for a dictionary app as complete as that one! You heard me right FREE.

Since this App blew me away I did the first ever Gaijinlife youtube video click here for it:

So in this video I will walk you trough Kotoba showing you this App sweet features.
I really hope you will like the video. Dont be shy and tell me what you think about this first video.

Probably tomorrow or at the latest Wednesday I will have a post and video dedicated on the best Tokyo App ever

TokyoTeleport and the TokyoTeleport plus!

Be sure to check it out!

Yugo

Authentic Teriyaki Burgers!!

teriyaki burger

“Teriyaki Burger” by tsukacyi

Every Japanese burger shop has a teriyaki burger in its menu, and it is one of the most popular burgers here in Japan.

A teriyaki burger normally has a chicken or beef patty with teriyaki sauce, mayonnaise and lettuce in of course a buns.

Many people in other countries get surprised to find mayonnaise on teriyaki sauce but Japanese mayonnaise is bit vinegary, so it tastes great with sweet teriyaki sauce.

At MOS BURGER, the fast-food restaurant that sold the very first teriyaki burger in the world, they serve rice buns, which are crispy,  kind of chewy textured and perfect for teriyaki burgers!

Do you want to eat teriyaki burgers now?

Well, you don’t have to go to a Japanese burger shop, you can make it at home!

All  you need is buns, a beef patty, thick teriyaki sauce, some mayonnaise and lettuce.

Bon appetit!!


From Japanstyle2010

http://www.japanstyle.info/

Ever wonder about Japan’s crown jewels

I was recently reading a book about Japan history and I found some really nice information about the Imperial jewels.

It did motivate me to share it with you so after a bit more research I came up with this:

No visit to any capital  in the world is complete without seeing the country’s crown jewels. A famous example would be the Tower of London and its wonderful treasures! Kept safe behind tick glass casings, they intrigue and fascinate visitors who admire those golden treasures that make up a nation’s objects of royalty.

But out of all those majestic nations that have preserve the kingship lineage or that still preserve some kind of historical ties to royalty, one exception prevail Japan! There were never a visit in Japan that could have brought you to even think  about seeing the relics of the emperor of Japan. You could still see from a far distance, the place holding those wonderful object  but you will never even set a foot in the vicinity of the building.

Don’t be worry if I sound harsh, not even the emperor him self has seeing those object at lest not since the 12th century. Object that should be presented to him on is enthronement lay unseen and undistributed for 1000s of years, wrapped in many layers of cloths to be then stored in boxes.

Even if those items have not seeing the light for so long they have  played an incredibly important role in Japan. They are symbols of the power of the emperor of Japan; the mirror, the jewels and the famous sword.

Maybe one day we will have the chance to finally see them back as a wonderful token of Japanese history.

Found this wonderful picture of the Tokyo Imperial palace

Hoped you liked this funny historical fact about the Imperial Jewels of Japan

Gaijinlife on Ustream!

Hey everyone Yugo here

! If you started visiting gaijinlife when we started you have surely noticed that there are a lot of things changing. I really do hope you like what I’m doing for the website!

In that optic I am opening a Ustream channel for Gaijinlife!

I will not start broadcasting right away I will make sure I can find good subject to talk about and that I first have some people interested to watch my show lol! So go check out the page, subscribe to it and let me know what would be the good first topic to start the new show on!?!

Here is the page

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/gaijinlife-show

Chronicle of a young woman in Japan

Chronicle of a young woman in Japan

Ok in this post I had an interview with a friend of mind, she used to live in Japan and I really wanted her to share a little bit of her experiences living there. She is also managing and writing for the mecha genki bento blog

http://mechagenkibento.blogspot.com/

And why not follow her on twitter! Here is her page:

http://twitter.com/mecha_genki

Let’s get this interview started!

Hello Nichola how are you?

I am really good today! how about you Yugo?

Hihihihi Super great


How’d you first get interested in Japan?

The year before I started high school I had to decide what language I was going to study (we had to study a language for the first two years at my high school).  Making such a big decision when you are 12 is a bit hard!  We had the choice of Japanese, German, French or Maori.  I was tossing up between Japanese and German.  My Dad phoned his cousin who had also studied Japanese at school.  He is a lawyer, and at the time I also wanted to be a lawyer.  He said having Japanese had been useful for having Japanese clients, so I decided to do Japanese (I did not end up being a lawyer though!).  After studying Japanese for two compulsory years, I figured I might as well continue on because I’d put in that much effort already, which was the same reason I kept studying it right up until my second year at university).


When did you first go to Japan?

My first trip to Japan was in 6th form (when I was 16).  My high school did an exchange with our sister school in Matsuyama, Ehime.  We had two weeks in Matsuyama and then another week going to Beppu, Hiroshima, Kyoto, Nara and Tokyo.  30 girls between 14 and 18, with just two teachers!


Where have you been in Japan?

Matsuyama, Uchiko, Beppu, Hiroshima, Miyajima, Kurashiki, Matsue, Okayama, Kyoto, Nara, Kobe, Koyasan, Hakone, Himeji, Yokohama, Tokyo.


What was it like living in Japan?

AWESOME!!!!  I lived in Osaka and taught English by video conferencing (it looked a bit like a call centre).  There were about 450 on the English team, and about 750 altogether in my building, working three shifts (it was 24hrs and we had six languages).
The whole move was so easy because the company I worked for (NOVA) arranged all your visas and stuff.  They rented apartments to teachers (which they charged you wayyyyy more than market rents, but that is another story, and I figured the ease of it made it all even out in the end).
The week I started there was about 30 of us, the same started the week before and the week after.  I have heard stories of some people going and being stuck in a small town, having to be friends with people just for the sake of it and not really enjoying it.  I was lucky there were so many of us – I lived in the same city for university but I can imagine it would be a bit like going away to university.
I worked one early shift (7:30am – 3pm) and four lates (3pm – 10:40pm).  Life was very easy because you pretty much had the whole day free. I could get up and go to a gym class and then be back home by 8:30 and still have almost a whole day before work!  Because I can speak Japanese things were quite easy, and Osaka is such a big city that you can always get food from home/watch English tv/buy NZ wine etc.  Day to-day living is very cheap in Japan and I used to ride my bike everywhere (one day I even rode to Hyogo prefecture!!).  Ignorance is bliss in some ways too because it always seemed like the really important stuff was translated into English, so if there was anything I couldn’t understand I didn’t really mind.
My first flat was with two girls from work, and then I moved to another flat with a Japanese girl.  Quite often my friend Amy and I would have what we called “I can’t believe we’re in Japan” moments where just the coolest stuff would happen and we couldn’t believe we were experiencing it.  Sometimes we used to sit on the 15th floor break room at work and look down at Osaka (we were the tallest building for miles) and just stare.


What do you think is the best thing about Japan?

Japan is the land of extremes – to me that is it’s best point and worst point.  There are just so many things to do, everything is just so different, you could be in Osaka 100 years and always find something to do.  I used to love just riding my bike around all day and exploring new neighborhoods  because it isn’t like suburbia here. It’s like so many villages together.
People are so friendly and helpful  – every time I’ve been to Tokyo I only have to open a map and people have rushed up to help!
Going to the doctor used to amaze me – it seemed the smaller your problem the better the treatment – once I had an insect bite that went yuck.  I went to the doctor but didn’t see a GP like at home, it was a proper dermatologist who gave me this amazing cream.  Another time Amy had an eye infection and I went with her to see this proper eye doctor!
You can drink in public too.  That is pretty cool!


What do you think is the worst thing about Japan?

Sometimes Japan isn’t flexible and there seem to be rules that can’t be broken for no reason.  People don’t think outside the square sometimes, and if there are two ways of doing something you can often guarantee it will be the long way! My gym used to shut two random days each month for “cleaning”.  ATMs used to shut on weekends, even though they are automated! (not sure if this is still the case).


How’d you get into bento-ing?

After I joined weight watchers I was googling healthy lunch ideas and thought I’d see about bento ideas, because I bought a Hello Kitty bento when I went to Japan at high school.  I was expecting just boring normal stuff – I had no idea about what bento are like nowadays!  I like cooking and baking, and needed a new hobby (cupcakes aren’t weight watchers friendly), so pretty much just decided to start making bento.  Then I got onto twitter and started making bento friends and started getting inspired by them all.  My friend Sarah then suggested I make a blog to keep track of them all.   I live by myself so it’s hard to buy lots of ingredients and use them up before they go off, but I’ve learnt that all it takes is a little thought, and making things and freezing where possible.  I can’t wait until I go to Japan in July and can buy lots more bento goods!


When is the next time you will go to Japan?
July this year! I can NOT wait! I’m going with my friend and her husband for just under a week, and then I have just over a week by myself.

Hope you liked this post, hoped it will show you a little bit more insight into the life of foreigners in Japan!

Yugo

!!Coming soon!!

Here is the list of the up and coming post on Gaijinlife

Internet and Manga Cafes

An interview with Dan from Japanese castle explorer.com

money gifts gosyugi

skateboarding in Tokyo and Japan

Koishikawa Korakuen Garden in Bunkyo-ku

Tips to understand Japanese’s sense of humor

Many more post coming in the next weeks


Here is the picture of the day

This picture was taken by Guillaume Marcotte form tokyoluv.com

The shibuya crossing